Nectar definition

nĕktər
(bot.) The sweetish liquid in many flowers, used by bees for the making of honey.
noun
20
6
(class. myth.) The drink of the gods.
noun
11
6
A sweet liquid that many plants secrete from specialized structures, often inside flowers, where it serves to attract pollinators such as certain insects and birds. Bees use nectar to make honey.
noun
7
5
A sweet liquid secreted by plants as food to attract animals that will benefit them. Many flowers produce nectar to attract pollinating insects, birds, and bats. Bees collect nectar to make into honey. Nectar is produced in structures called nectaries. Some plants have nectaries located elsewhere, outside the flower. These provide a food source for animals such as ants which in turn defend the plant from harmful insects. Nectar consists primarily of water and varying concentrations of many different sugars, including fructose, glucose, and sucrose.
6
4
Any very delicious beverage.
noun
4
3
Advertisement
(botany) The sweet liquid secreted by flowers to attract pollinating insects and birds. [from 17th c.]
noun
1
1
(greek & roman mythology) The drink of the gods.
noun
6
7
A beverage containing fruit juice or purée.
noun
0
2
A delicious or invigorating drink.
noun
0
2
(chiefly mythology) The drink of the gods. [from 16th c.]
noun
0
2
Advertisement
(by extension) Any delicious drink, now especially a type of sweetened fruit juice. [from 16th c.]
noun
0
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
nectar
Plural:
nectars

Origin of nectar

  • Latin from Greek nektar drink of the gods nek-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Latin nectar, from Ancient Greek νέκταρ (nektar, “nourishment of the gods"), from νέκ (nek, “death") (see necro-) + ταρ (tar, “overcoming"), from Proto-Indo-European *tere (“to overcome, pass through, cross over").

    From Wiktionary