Middleware meaning

mĭdl-wâr
Software that serves as an intermediary between systems software and an application.
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Software that functions as a conversion or translation layer. Middleware is also a consolidator and integrator. Custom-programmed middleware solutions have been developed for decades to enable one application to interface with another, which either runs on a different platform or comes from a different vendor. Today, there is a diverse group of middleware products as outlined in the following examples. See application integration.
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Programs that serve as intermediaries and translators between two different computing platforms, perhaps between client workstations requesting data or programs, and servers that provide them. Middleware is used in cross-platform situations where the clients and servers run on different operating systems (OSs) or where different database file structures are used. See also client, database, OS, server, and software.
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An application connecting two separate applications. Middleware systems provide functionality such as distribution of components, deployment, and transaction services that developers can integrate into their own applications without having to worry about implementation details. In 2006, Microsoft’s .NET architecture and various implementations of Sun Microsystems’ J2EE Standard were popular forms of middleware. Symantec Security Response. Glossary. [Online, July 15, 2004.] Symantec Security Response Website. http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/refa.html.
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(computing) Software that functions at an intermediate layer between applications and operating system or database management system, or between client and server.
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Networking software/hardware that is deployed in the middle of, as opposed to serviced by, a packet network to enhance or provide some network function, such as caching, filtering, or firewall functionality.
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Origin of middleware

  • middle +"Ž -ware

    From Wiktionary