Mare meaning

mâr
Frequency:
A sea.
noun
5
0
The definition of a mare is an adult female horse, donkey, burro or mule.

An example of a mare is a horse that gives birth.

noun
4
0
An adult female horse or the adult female of other equine species.
noun
4
1
(UK, colloquial) (Shortening of nightmare) A nightmare; a frustrating or terrible experience.

I'm having a complete mare today.

noun
3
0
Any of the large dark areas on the moon or on Mars or other planets.
noun
2
0
Advertisement
A fully mature female horse, mule, donkey, burro, etc.; specif., a female horse that has reached the age of five.
noun
0
0
Any of several vast, dark, flat areas visible from the earth on the surface of the moon, Mercury, or Mars.
noun
0
0
(obs., folklore) An evil spirit that causes nightmares.
noun
0
0
An adult female horse or the adult female of other equine species.
noun
0
0
Any of the large, low-lying dark areas on the Moon or on Mars or other inner planets. The lunar maria are believed to consist of volcanic basalts, and many are believed to be basins formed initially by large impacts with meteoroids and later filled with lava flows.
0
0
Advertisement
An adult female horse.
noun
0
0
(UK, pejorative, slang) A foolish woman.
noun
0
0
(planetology) A dark, large circular plain; a “sea".
noun
0
0
(planetology) On Saturn's moon Titan, a large expanse of what is thought to be liquid hydrocarbons.
noun
0
0

Origin of mare

  • Middle English alteration of Old English mȳre (influenced by forms of mearh horse) marko- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Latin sea mori- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English mare, mere, from Old English mere, miere (“female horse, mare"), from Proto-Germanic *marhijō (“female horse"), from Proto-Indo-European *mark-, *marḱ- (“horse"). Cognate with Scots mere, meir, mear (“mare"), North Frisian mar (“mare, horse"), West Frisian merje (“mare"), Dutch merrie (“mare"), German Mähre (“mare"), Danish mær (“mare"), Swedish märr (“mare"), Icelandic meri (“mare"). Related also to Old English mearh (“male horse, steed").

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English mare, from Old English mare (“nightmare, monster"), from Proto-Germanic *marÇ­ (“nightmare, incubus") (compare Dutch (dial.) mare, German (dial.) Mahr, Old Norse mara (> Danish mare, Swedish mara 'incubus, nightmare')), from Proto-Indo-European *mor- (“feminine evil spirit"). Akin to Old Irish Morrígain 'elf queen', Albanian tmerr (“horror"), Polish zmora 'nightmare', Czech mura 'nightmare, moth'.

    From Wiktionary

  • Alternative etymology cites derivation via Old English mere, miere, from Proto-Germanic *marhijō (cf. Dutch merrie, German Mähre), from *marhaz (“horse") (compare Old English mearh), from Gaulish markos (compare Welsh march), from Iranian marikas (compare Old Persian marikas 'male, manly'), from maryas (compare Avestan mairya 'man; male animal'); akin to Sanskrit máryas 'young man; stallion'. More at marry.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Latin mare (“sea").

    From Wiktionary