Manchester meaning

măn'chĕs'tər, -chĭ-stər
A city of northwest England east-northeast of Liverpool. Founded on the site of Celtic and Roman settlements, it was first chartered in 1301. Greater Manchester is highly industrialized. The Manchester Ship Canal (completed in 1894) affords access for oceangoing vessels.
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A town of north-central Connecticut east of Hartford. Settled in 1672, it was once a major center of silk production.
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The largest city of New Hampshire, in the southeast part of the state on the Merrimack River north of Nashua. Incorporated as Derryfield in 1751 and renamed in 1810, it was an important textile center from the mid-1800s until the 1930s.
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City & port in NW England, connected by canal (Manchester Ship Canal), 35 mi (56 km) long, with the Irish Sea.
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City in S N.H., on the Merrimack River.
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(Australia, New Zealand, uncountable) Household linen.
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(Australia, New Zealand, countable) The section of a department store dealing with household linen.
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(uncountable) A type of velveteen cloth; cotton velveteen.
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Major city in the north-west of England.
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Any of several towns and cities in the United States of America.
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A town in Bolivia.
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A community in Nova Scotia, Canada.
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A settlement in Suriname.
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Origin of manchester

After the city of Manchester, England, once an important centre for the manufacture of cotton textile goods.