Macaronic meaning

măkə-rŏnĭk
Of or containing a mixture of vernacular words with Latin words or with vernacular words given Latinate endings.

Macaronic verse.

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Of or involving a mixture of two or more languages.
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Involving or characterized by a mixture of languages; esp., designating or of burlesque verse in which real or coined words from two or more languages are mixed, or words of a modern language are given Latin case endings and mixed with Latin words.
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Macaronic verse.
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(archaic) Jumbled, mixed.
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(literature) Written in a hodgepodge mixture of two or more languages.
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(literature) A work of macaronic character.
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(linguistics) A word consisting of a mix of words of two or more languages, one of which is Latin, or a non-Latin stem with a Latin ending.
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Origin of macaronic

  • French macaronique or Latin macaronicus after Macaronea , title of a poem by Tifi Odasi (c.1450–1492), 15th-century Italian author, that contained such verse and satirized those who used poor Latin and affectedly Latinized Italian from Italian maccherone macaroni (considered food for peasants) macaroni

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From New Latin, 1517 coinage, macaronicus, from Italian (Neapolitan dialect) maccarone (“coarse dumpling").

    From Wiktionary