Ling definition

lĭng
Frequency:
In a specified direction, manner, or condition.

Darkling.

suffix
2
0
Any of various marine food fish, of the genus Molva, resembling the cod.
noun
2
0
Small or young (person or thing specified)

Duckling.

affix
2
1
One connected with.

Worldling.

suffix
1
0
One having a specified quality.

Underling.

suffix
1
0
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Any of several edible gadoid fishes mostly of the N Atlantic.
noun
1
0
One in relation to a (specified) thing, esp. in seeming subordinate, unimportant, or contemptible.

Hireling, earthling, groundling.

affix
1
0
(now chiefly dial.) In a (specified) manner, condition, or direction; to a (specified) extent.

Darkling.

affix
1
0
Short for common ling, Molva molva.
noun
1
0
Any of various varieties of heather or broom.
noun
1
0
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A diminutive modifier of nouns having either the physical sense of "a younger, smaller or inferior version of what is denoted by the original noun", or the derived sense indicating possession of or connection with a quality, which may having the sense of "a follower or resident of what is denoted by the stem form".
suffix
1
0
(as an adverb) In the manner or direction indicated by the main stem (object.)
suffix
1
0
Any of various marine food fishes closely related to and resembling the cod, especially Molva molva of northern Atlantic waters, having a long body and a barbel on the chin.
noun
1
1
Linguistics.
abbreviation
1
1
One that is young, small, or inferior.

Duckling.

suffix
1
2
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noun
1
2

Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
ling
Plural:
lings

Origin of ling

  • ME -linge < OE -ling, -lang < IE base *lenk-, to bend > Latvian lùnkans, flexible

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • ME < OE, combining the bases of -le + -ing

    From Webster's New World College Dictionary, 5th Edition

  • Middle English possibly of Low German origin del-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English from Old English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English -ling, from Old English -ling, from Proto-Germanic *-lingaz, a nominal suffix, probably composed of Proto-Germanic *-ilaz (agent/instrumental suffix) + Proto-Germanic *-ingaz (patronymic suffix). Akin to Old High German -ling, Old Norse -lingr, Gothic -𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (-liggs) (in 𐌲𐌰𐌳𐌹𐌻𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (gadiliggs)). More at -le, -ing.

    From Wiktionary