Latitude meaning

lătĭ-to͝od, -tyo͝od
Frequency:
Freedom from narrow restrictions; freedom of opinion, conduct, or action.
noun
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(archaic) Width; breadth.
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A range of values or conditions, especially the range of exposures over which a photographic film yields usable images.
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(rare) Breadth; width.
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The location north or south of the equator, measured in degrees from the equator, which is 0. The North Pole is plus 90 degrees, and the South Pole is minus 90 degrees. Degrees are further divided into minutes and seconds.East/West LongitudeLongitude is the location east and west of the Greenwich prime meridian in London, measured in degrees from this reference point, which is 0. Europe is plus degrees to the east, and the Americas are minus degrees to the west.To pinpoint a location on earth, the north/south latitude (y-axis) is combined with the east/west longitude (x-axis). For example, the Empire State Building in New York is expressed in degrees, minutes and seconds as follows:
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Extent; scope; range of applicability.
noun
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A measure of relative position north or south on the Earth's surface, measured in degrees from the equator, which has a latitude of 0°, with the poles having a latitude of 90° north and south. The distance of a degree of latitude is about 69 statute miles or 60 nautical miles (111 km). Latitude and longitude are the coordinates that together identify all positions on the Earth's surface.
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(astronomy) The angular distance of a celestial body north or south of the ecliptic.
noun
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Freedom from normal restraints, limitations, or regulations.
noun
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The definition of latitude is the measurement of a part of the Earth in relation to the north or south of the Earth's equator or the amount of freedom someone is given to deviate from a normal thought pattern or behavior.

An example of latitude is a measurement of distance from the equator.

An example of latitude is when you have wide freedom to do what you would like.

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Celestial latitude.
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(geography, astronomy) The angular distance north or south from a planet's equator, measured along the meridian of that particular point.
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(geography) An imaginary line (in fact a circle) around a planet running parallel to the planet's equator.
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The relative freedom from restrictions; scope to do something.

His parents gave him a great deal of latitude.

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(astronomy) The angular distance of a heavenly body from the ecliptic.
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(photography) The extent to which a light-sensitive material can be over- or underexposed and still achieve an acceptable result.
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Extent or scope; e.g. breadth, width or amplitude.
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Origin of latitude

  • Middle English geographical latitude from Old French width from Latin lātitūdō width, geographical latitude from lātus wide

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French latitude, from Latin lātitÅ«dō (“breadth, width, latitude"), from lātus (“broad, wide"), for older stlatus.

    From Wiktionary