Isotropic meaning

īsə-trōpĭk, -trŏpĭk
Having physical properties (e.g., conductivity, elasticity, and power density) that are the same in any direction of measurement.
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Identical in all directions; invariant with respect to direction.
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Having physical properties, as conductivity, elasticity, etc., that are the same regardless of the direction of measurement.
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Identical in all directions; invariant with respect to direction. For example, isotropic scattering of light by a substance entails that the intensity of light radiated is the same in all directions.
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The properties of a material that are the same in all directions. For example, an isotropic antenna radiates the same power in all directions. In practice, antennas cannot be 100% isotropic. However, a perfect isotropic antenna, called an "isotropic radiator," can be calculated, and it is used as a basis for measuring the signal strength of real antennas. Contrast with anisotropic. See dBi.
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In telecommunications, an antenna, light source, or sound source that theoretically radiates a signal with equal power density in all directions. A purely isotropic source does not exist, except in theory. In telecommunications, as in all things natural and unnatural, perfection is purely theoretical.
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(physics) Having properties that are identical in all directions; exhibiting isotropy.
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The definition of isotropic is a physics term that means identical in all directions.

An example of isotropic is table salt.

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Origin of isotropic

  • From iso- + Ancient Greek τρὁπος (trhopos, “turn, way, manner, disposition”) + -ic. Compare Ancient Greek ἰσὁτροπος (ishotropos) of like character

    From Wiktionary