Isobar meaning

īsə-bär
A line drawn on a weather map connecting places having the same atmospheric pressure. The distance between isobars indicates the barometric gradient (the degree of change in atmospheric pressure) across the region shown on the map. When the lines are close together, a strong pressure gradient is indicated, creating conditions for strong winds. When the lines are far apart, a weak pressure gradient is indicated and calm weather is forecast.
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Any of two or more kinds of atoms having the same atomic mass but different atomic numbers.
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(meteorology) A line drawn on a map or chart connecting places of equal or constant pressure.
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Any atom that has the same atomic weight (or mass number) as another atom but a different atomic number (Ex.: carbon-14 and nitrogen-14)
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A line on a weather map connecting points of equal atmospheric pressure.
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(nuclear physics) Either of two nuclides of different elements having the same mass number.
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(thermodynamics) A set of points or conditions at constant pressure.
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A line on a map connecting points having equal barometric pressure at a given reference altitude, commonly sea level, over a given period or at a given time.
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Origin of isobar

  • iso– Greek baros weight gwerə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ancient Greek ἴσος (isos, “equal”) + βάρος (baros, “weight”)

    From Wiktionary