Ink meaning

ĭngk
A pigmented liquid or paste used especially for writing or printing.
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A dark liquid ejected for protection by most cephalopods, including octopuses and squids.
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(informal) Coverage in the print media; publicity.

Her campaign rallies generated a lot of ink.

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(informal) A tattoo or tattoos.

Showed us his ink.

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To mark, coat, or stain with ink.
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(informal) To append one's signature to (a contract, for example).
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(informal) To tattoo.
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A colored liquid used for writing, drawing, etc.
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A sticky, colored paste used in printing; printer's ink.
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(slang) Publicity, esp. in newspapers.
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A dark, liquid secretion ejected by cuttlefish, octopuses, and squid to confuse or inhibit a predator.
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To cover with ink; spread ink on.
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To mark, write, sign, draw, or color with ink.
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(informal) To sign one's name to.
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A dark liquid ejected for protection by most cephalopods, including the octopus and squid. Ink consists of highly concentrated melanin.
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A pigment (dye)-based fluid used for writing, printing etc.
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(countable) A particular type, color or container of this fluid.
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The black or dark-colored fluid ejected by squid, octopus etc, as a protective strategy.
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(slang, uncountable) Publicity.

The TSA has been getting a lot of ink lately.

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(slang, uncountable) Tattoo work.
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(slang) Cheap red wine.
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To apply ink to; to cover or smear with ink.
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To sign (a document) (with or as if with ink).
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To apply a tattoo to (someone).
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Origin of ink

  • Middle English inke from Old French enque from Late Latin encaustum purple ink from Greek enkauston painted in encaustic from enkaiein to paint in encaustic, burn in encaustic

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French enque, from Latin encaustum (“purple ink used by Roman emperors to sign documents”), from Ancient Greek ἔγκαυστον (enkauston, “burned-in”), from ἐν (en, “in”) + καίω (kaiō, “burn”).

    From Wiktionary