Human-genome-project definitions

An international scientific research project that was conducted between 1990 and 2003 to determine the base-pair sequences in human DNA and to store this information in computer databases for the subsequent identification and analysis of genes and other features of the genome.
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An international scientific research project that was conducted between 1990 and 2003 to determine the base-pair sequences in human DNA and to store this information in computer databases for the subsequent identification and analysis of genes and other features of the genome.
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An international scientific research project designed to study and identify all of the genes in the human genome, to determine the base-pair sequences in human DNA, and to store this information in computer databases. The Human Genome Project began in the United States in 1990 and was completed in 2003.
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A bioinformatics project that has identified the 30,000 genes in human DNA. Coordinated by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Human Genome Project started in 1990 and released its findings in February 2001 along with findings from a separate project by Celera Genomics Group. There are similar projects in other countries as well. The purpose is to store the three billion chemical base pairs (the DNA sequence) derived from these analyses in databases for use in biomedical research. See micro array.The End GoalThe goal of the Human Genome Project is to determine the relationships between DNA makeup and human traits and predispositions. Although sequencing costs have been extremely expensive, they are approaching the USD $1,000 level per human genome, enabling "personalized genomics" to dramatically alter the course of medicine. See Personal Genome Project.A Human Component DictionaryThis information is not a blueprint of the human being, rather it is a dictionary of components. Once believed that each gene made only one protein, it is now believed that each gene creates numerous proteins, although this information is expected to take years to determine. Part of the U.S. government project is to study the ethical and legal impact that this information will have on society. An abundance of information can be found at www.genome.gov.
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