Here meaning

hîr
At or in this place.

Stop here for a rest.

adverb
7
2
At this time; now.

We'll adjourn the meeting here and discuss remaining issues after lunch.

adverb
4
2
At or on this point, detail, or item.

Here I must disagree.

adverb
4
2
Used especially for emphasis after the demonstrative pronoun this or these, or after a noun modified by the demonstrative adjective this or these:

This tire here is flat.

adjective
3
2
In the present life or condition.
adverb
2
2
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Used for emphasis between the demonstrative adjective this or these and a noun.

This here tire is flat.

adjective
0
0
Used to respond to a roll call, attract attention, command an animal, or rebuke, admonish, or concur.
interjection
0
0
This place.
noun
0
0
The present time or state.

We are living in the here and can only speculate about the hereafter.

noun
0
0
At or in this place.
adverb
0
0
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Toward, to, or into this place; hither.

Come here.

adverb
0
0
At this point in an action, speech, discussion, etc.; now.

Here the judge interrupted.

adverb
0
0
On earth; in earthly life.
adverb
0
0
Used to call attention, answer a roll call, etc.
interjection
0
0
Used to express indignation, remonstrance, etc., esp. when repeated.
interjection
0
0
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This place or point.
noun
0
0
(location) In, on, or at this place.

I'm here!

adverb
0
0
(location) To this place; used in place of the more dated hither.

Please come here.

adverb
0
0
(abstract) In this context.

Derivatives can refer to anything that is derived from something else, but here they refer specifically to functions that give the slope of the tangent line to a curve.

adverb
0
0
At this point in the argument or narration.

Here endeth the lesson.

adverb
0
0
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(abstract) This place; this location.

An Alzheimer patient's here may in his mind be anywhere he called home in the time he presently re-lives.

noun
0
0
(abstract) This time, the present situation.

Here in history, we are less diligent about quashing monopolies.

noun
0
0
Filler after a noun or demonstrative pronoun, solely for emphasis.

John here is a rascal.

adjective
0
0
Filler after a demonstrative pronoun but before the noun it modifies, solely for emphasis.

This here orange is too sour.

adjective
0
0
(UK, slang) Used for emphasis at the beginning of a sentence when expressing an opinion or want.

Here, I'm tired and I want a drink.

interjection
0
0
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An army, host.
noun
0
0
A hostile force.
noun
0
0
(Anglo-Saxon) An invading army, either that of the enemy, or the national troops serving abroad. Compare fyrd.
noun
0
0
An enemy, individual enemy.
noun
0
0
Here means in this place.

An example of here is where one is right now.

adverb
0
1
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Here is defined as a way to express comfort, draw attention or announce presence.

An example of here is "Here, let me help you."

An example of here is the word used by students to respond when the teacher does morning attendance.

interjection
0
1
To this place; hither.

Come here, please.

adverb
0
1
be out of here
  • To leave; depart.
idiom
0
0
neither here nor there
  • Unimportant and irrelevant.
idiom
0
0
here and there
  • In, at, or to various places or points.
idiom
0
0
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here goes!
  • An exclamation used when the speaker is about to do something new, daring, disagreeable, etc.
idiom
0
0
here's to
  • Here's a toast to; I wish success (or joy, etc.) to.
idiom
0
0
here you are
  • A phrase used to indicate or express a mild instruction to accept or take what is being offered, as when something is being handed or presented to someone.
idiom
0
0
here we go!
  • An exclamation used variously.
idiom
0
0
neither here nor there
  • Beside the point; irrelevant.
idiom
0
0
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the here and now
  • This place and this time; the present.
idiom
0
0

Origin of here

  • Middle English from Old English hēr ko- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old Scots heir, from Middle English here, heere (“army”), from Old English here (“army”), from Proto-Germanic *harjaz (“army”), from Proto-Indo-European *kory- (“war, troops”). Cognate with Old Saxon heri (“army”), Dutch heer, heir, Old High German heri, hari (German Heer, “army”), Danish hær (“army”), Gothic (harjis, “army”). More at harry.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English here, from Old English hēr (“in this place”), from Proto-Germanic *hē₂r, from Proto-Indo-European *ki- (“this”) + adverbial suffix *-r. Cognate with the English pronoun he, German hier, Dutch hier, her, Icelandic hér, Faroese, Norwegian, Danish her, Swedish här.

    From Wiktionary