Hackney meaning

hăknē
Frequency:
A trotting horse suited for routine riding or driving; a hack.
noun
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A coach or carriage for hire.
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To hire out; let.
verb
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Banal; trite.
adjective
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Having been hired.
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A horse for ordinary driving or riding.
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A carriage for hire.
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(obs.) A drudge.
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Hired out.
adjective
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Trite; commonplace.
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(place) Borough of Greater London, England.
proper name
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(archaic) An ordinary horse.
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A carriage for hire or a cab.
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A horse used to ride or drive.
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A breed of English horse.
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(archaic) A hired drudge; a hireling; a prostitute.
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(not comparable) Offered for hire; hence, much used; trite; mean.

Hackney coaches.

Hackney authors.

adjective
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To make uninteresting or trite by frequent use.
verb
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To use as a hackney.
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A London borough where once upon a time many horses were pastured.
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One of several breeds of compact English horses.
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An English habitational surname​.
pronoun
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(in compounds) (A means of transportation that is) Available for public hire.
pronoun
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To cause to become banal and trite through overuse.
verb
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A horse of a breed developed in England, having a gait characterized by pronounced flexion of the knee.
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Origin of hackney

  • Middle English hakenei probably after Hakenei , Hackney, a borough of London, England, where such horses were raised

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • The senses "a horse" and "(a means of transport) available for hire" derive from the fact that many horses were kept in the London borough of Hackney, and were available for hire. The place name is from Old English Hacan ieg "Hacan's Isle" ("Hook's Island"), referring to dry land in a marsh.

    From Wiktionary

  • Probably from Hackney, formerly a town, now a borough of London, used for grazing horses before sale, or from Old French haquenee (“ambling mare for ladies”), Latinized in England to hakeneius (though some recent French sources report that the English usage predates the French)

    From Wiktionary