Goth definition

gŏth
Frequency:
A member of a Germanic people that invaded and conquered most of the Roman Empire in the 3d, 4th, and 5th centuries a.d.
noun
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A devotee of goth music or fashions.
noun
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A performer or follower of this style of music.
noun
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A form of music derived from punk rock and characterized by melodramatically morose or morbid lyrics.
noun
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Of or having to do with goth music, styles, or attitudes.
adjective
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Gothic.
abbreviation
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(uncountable) A punk-derived subculture of people who predominately dress in black.

Philip had been into goth for many years.

noun
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(uncountable, music) A style of punk rock influenced by glam rock; gothic rock.
noun
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(countable) A person who is part of the goth subculture.

We saw a solitary goth hanging out on the steps of the train station.

noun
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Relating to this music or these people.

With her black clothes and dyed hair, Melanie looked very goth compared to her classmates.

adjective
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A member of a Germanic people who invaded the Roman Empire in the early centuries of the Christian era.
noun
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A style characterized by black clothing, heavy, dark makeup, and a preoccupation with the themes of goth music.
noun
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A member of the East Germanic tribe, who invaded the Roman Empire in the 3rd to 5th centuries.
pronoun
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(figuratively) Uncivilized person, barbarian, Vandal.
pronoun
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(linguistics) Gothic.
abbreviation
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An uncouth, uncivilized person; barbarian.
noun
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A style of rock music, noted especially for somber or ethereal tones and lugubrious lyrics.
noun
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
goth
Plural:
goths

Origin of goth

  • From Middle English Gothes Goths from Late Latin Gothī of Germanic origin Old English Gota Old Norse Goti Goth

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Gothic (from a view of Gothic styles or genres as dark or gloomy)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English Gothes, Gotes (both plural). In turn partly from Old English Gotan, Goþan, singular Gota, Goþa, and partly from Late Latin Gothi. Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *gutô, perhaps from *geutaną (“to pour”), but more likely from *gudanaz. Compare Old Norse Goti (“Gotlander, Goth”), and related also to Gutnish, Gotland.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Goth (person of a Germanic culture), influenced by Gothic in the sense of a black horror novel.

    From Wiktionary