Glucose meaning

glo͝o'kōs'
A monosaccharide sugar, C6 H12 O6 , that is used by living things to obtain energy through the process of aerobic respiration within cells. It is the principal circulating sugar in the blood of humans and other mammals.
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A colorless to yellowish syrupy mixture of dextrose, maltose, and dextrins containing about 20 percent water, used in confectionery, alcoholic fermentation, tanning, and treating tobacco.
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A monosaccharide sugar, C6 H12 O6 , that is used by living things to obtain energy through the process of aerobic respiration within cells. It is the principal circulating sugar in the blood of humans and other mammals.
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A colorless to yellowish syrupy mixture of dextrose, maltose, and dextrins containing about 20 percent water, used in confectionery, alcoholic fermentation, tanning, and treating tobacco.
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A crystalline monosaccharide occurring naturally in fruits, honey, and blood: the commercial form, also containing dextrin and maltose, is prepared as a sweet syrup or, upon desiccation, as a white solid, by the hydrolysis of starch in the presence of dilute acids or enzymes.
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A monosaccharide sugar, C6 H12 O6 , that is used by living things to obtain energy through the process of aerobic respiration within cells. It is the principal circulating sugar in the blood of humans and other mammals.
noun
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A colorless to yellowish syrupy mixture of dextrose, maltose, and dextrins containing about 20 percent water, used in confectionery, alcoholic fermentation, tanning, and treating tobacco.
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A monosaccharide sugar found in plant and animal tissues. Glucose is a product of photosynthesis, mostly incorporated into the disaccharide sugar sucrose rather than circulating free in the plant. Glucose is essential for energy production in animal cells. It is transported by blood and lymph to all the cells of the body, where it is metabolized to form carbon dioxide and water along with ATP, the main source of chemical energy for cellular processes. Glucose molecules can also be linked into chains to form the polysaccharides cellulose, glycogen, and starch. Chemical formula: C6H12O6.
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(biochemistry) A simple monosaccharide (sugar) with a molecular formula of C6H12O6; it is a principle source of energy for cellular metabolism.
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Origin of glucose

French, from Ancient Greek γλεῦκος (gleukos, “must, sweet wine”) related to γλυκύς (glykys, “sweet”); note: -ose comes from glucose, not the other way round