Fractal definitions

frăk'təl
An object whose parts, at infinitely many levels of magnification, appear geometrically similar to the whole. Fractals are used in the design of compact antennas and for computer modeling of natural-looking structures like clouds and trees.
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An extremely irregular line or surface formed by the infinite repetition of a geometric pattern that becomes smaller and smaller with each repetition.
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A complex geometric pattern exhibiting self-similarity in that small details of its structure viewed at any scale repeat elements of the overall pattern.
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From the Latin fractus, translating as broken or fractured. An irregular or fragmented geometric shape that can be repeatedly subdivided into parts, each of which is a smaller copy of the whole. In words, a complex irregular object that is self-similar. Examples of fractal objects include mountain ranges, clouds, and lightening bolts. See also fractal transform.
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(mathematics) A mathematical set that has a non-integer and constant Hausdorff dimension; a geometric figure that is self-similar at all scales.
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(figuratively) An object, system, or idea that exhibits a fractal-like property.
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See also fractal.
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(mathematics) Having the form of a fractal.
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Origin of fractal

From French fractal, from Latin fractus (“broken”), perfect passive participle of frangō (“break, fragment”).