Flax meaning

flăks
The definition of flax is comes from a plant of the family Linaceae that has seeds for oil and a stem for linen.

An example of flax used as an adjective is in flax seed which is also made into linseed oil.

adjective
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Flax is defined as a plant in the family Linaceace that provides seeds for linseed oil and stem fibers that provide linen.

An example of flax is a plant with blue flowers that has threadlike fibers in the stem that can be spun into linen thread.

noun
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A pale grayish yellow.
noun
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Designating a family (Linaceae, order Linales) of dicotyledonous plants and shrubs usually having narrow leaves and five-part flowers.
adjective
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Any of a genus (Linum) of the flax family; esp. a slender, erect annual plant (L. usitatissimum) with delicate, blue flowers: the seeds are used to make linseed oil, and the fibers of the stem are spun into linen thread.
noun
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The threadlike fibers of these plants, ready for spinning.
noun
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Any of a number of flaxlike plants.
noun
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A plant of the genus Linum, especially Linum usitatissimum, which has a single, slender stalk, about a foot and a half high, with blue flowers. Also known as linseed, especially when referring to the seeds.
noun
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The fibers of Linum usitatissimum, grown to make linen and related textiles.
noun
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The flax bush, a plant of the genus Phormium, native to New Zealand, with strap-like leaves up to 3 metres long that grow in clumps.
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Origin of flax

  • Middle English from Old English fleax plek- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old English fleax, from Proto-Germanic *flahsą, from Proto-Indo-European *plek- (“to plait”). Cognate with Old Frisian flax, Old Saxon *flahs (Dutch vlas), Old High German flahs (German Flachs); the Northern Germanic (most likely the Gothic too) stem is different.

    From Wiktionary