Fast-track meaning

Fast track is defined as some course that is leading somewhere quickly, either literally or figuratively.

An example of fast track is a career woman who is quickly moving up in her office and who will be in a senior management position soon.

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The definition of fast track is to speed something up.

An example of fast track is when your banker friend pushes your loan application through more quickly than normal.

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A course leading to rapid advancement or change, as in a career.
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A course that leads to early consideration or review.

The board put the proposal on the fast track.

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A career path offering rapid advancement.
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A building method in which construction begins even before plans and designs are completed.
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Speedy or accelerated; expeditious.

Fast-track approval of a new drug.

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Designating or having to do with the power to enter into agreements that are not subject to Congressional modification.

The President's fast-track authority in trade negotiations.

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To speed up the progress of.
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An expedited litigation or discovery schedule ordered by the court, generally in relation to civil cases. See also speedy trial.
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To expedite a case schedule.
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A race track with optimum conditions for high speeds.
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The quickest or most direct method or path.

"Google welcomes the ISO decision to not approve the fast track of Microsoft's OOXML."

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A high-pressure or intensely competitive situation, particularly one characterised by rapid advancement.
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To progress something with unusual rapidity.

"The head of Sydney Airport thinks frequent flyers should be fast-tracked through security checks."

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Alternative spelling of fast track.
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