Expletive meaning

ĕksplĭ-tĭv
Frequency:
Anything serving as a filler.
noun
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A word, phrase, etc. not needed for the sense but used merely to fill out a sentence or metrical line, for grammar, rhythm, balance, etc.

There in “there is nothing left” is an expletive.

noun
5
1
An oath or exclamation, esp. an obscenity.
noun
3
1
(linguistics) A word without meaning added to fill a syntactic position.
noun
3
1
The definition of an expletive is a crude or obscene expression, or an unnecessary word or phrase used to fill space in a sentence for grammar or rhythm purposes.

An example of an expletive is saying "damn it."

An example of an expletive is adding "it is" in the sentence "time for us to eat."

noun
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Added or inserted in order to fill out something, such as a sentence or a metrical line.
adjective
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Serving to fill up, merely for effect, otherwise redundant.
adjective
1
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Marked by expletives (phrase-fillers).
adjective
1
0
A profane, vulgar term, notably a curse or obscene oath.
noun
0
0
(linguistics) A word that adds to the strength of a phrase without affecting its meaning; an intensifier.
noun
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0
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An exclamation or oath, especially one that is profane, vulgar, or obscene.
noun
0
1
Used to fill out a sentence, line, etc.
adjective
0
1

Origin of expletive

  • From Late Latin explētīvus serving to fill out from Latin explētus past participle of explēre to fill out ex- ex- plēre to fill pelə-1 in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin explētīvus (“serving to fill out”), from Latin explētus, the perfect passive participle of expleō (“fill out”), itself from ex (“out, completely”) + *pleō (“fill”).

    From Wiktionary