Equator meaning

ĭ-kwātər
The equator is defined as an imaginary line drawn on the Earth and spaced equally between the North and South Pole.

An example of the equator is the latitude of 0°.

noun
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A circle that divides a sphere or other surface into congruent parts.
noun
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An imaginary line forming a great circle around the Earth's surface, equidistant from the poles and in a plane perpendicular to the Earth's axis of rotation. It divides the Earth into the Northern and Southern hemispheres and is the basis from which latitude is measured.
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Any circle that divides a sphere or other body into two equal and symmetrical parts.
noun
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An imaginary circle around the earth, equally distant at all points from both the North and South Poles: it divides the earth's surface into the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.
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A similar great circle on any sphere, especially on a celestial body, or on other reasonably symmetrical three-dimensional body.
noun
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(often “the Equator”) An imaginary great circle around the Earth, equidistant from the two poles, and dividing earth's surface into the northern and southern hemisphere.
noun
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A short form of the celestial equator.
noun
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A circle like this around any celestial body.
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anagrams
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The Earth’s equator.
pronoun
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A similar circle on the surface of any celestial body.
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The celestial equator.
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The celestial equator.
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Origin of equator

  • Middle English from Medieval Latin aequātor (diēī et noctis) equalizer (of day and night) from Latin aequāre to equalize equate

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Late Latin (circulus) aequator (diei et noctis).

    From Wiktionary