Epizootic meaning

ĕpĭ-zō-ŏtĭk
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Occurring at the same time among an unusually large number of animals in a particular geographic area. Used of a disease.
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Epidemic among animals.
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An epizootic disease.
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Occurring at the same time among an unusually large number of animals in a particular geographic area. Used of a disease.
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An epizootic disease.
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Relating to a rapidly spreading disease that affects a large number of animals at the same time within a particular area.
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An epizootic disease.
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(epidemiology) An occurrence of a disease or disorder in a population of non-human animals at a frequency higher than that expected in a given time period. Compare epidemic.

At the same time as an epidemic of the flu broke out among the people, an epizootic of the swine flu broke out among their pigs.

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A particular epizootic (epizootically-occurring) disease.
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(dialectal, humorous, often in the plural) A disease or ailment.

Johnny's not doing so well today, I think he caught the epizootic.

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(epidemiology) Like or having to do with an epizootic: epidemic among animals.

Epizootic plague occurred in the mice following introduction of rats from Europe.

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(geology, rare) Containing fossils.
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An epizootic disease.
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Origin of epizootic

  • epi– zo(o)– –otic

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French épizootique, animal equivalent of epidemic, from épizootie, irregularly formed from Ancient Greek ἐπί (epi-) + ζῷον (zōon, “animal”). epi- +‎ zo- +‎ -otic. Use of the word in the second sense, "an ailment", was likely originally a reference to a particular epizootic ailment. Both senses are attested since at least the 1800s, and the pronunciation with five syllables is explicitly attested since then as well. Dialectal pronunciation of the second sense with four syllables is attested since at least the 1910s in spellings like "epizudic" and is suggested by 1870s references to a shortened form of the word, "zooty".

    From Wiktionary