Electromagnetic-spectrum Definition

noun
The complete range of frequencies of electromagnetic waves from the lowest to the highest, including, in order, radio, infrared, visible light, ultraviolet, X-ray, and gamma ray waves.
Webster's New World
other

The full range of electromagnetic energy that can be radiated, as defined by frequency (f), or wavelength , which is the inverse of frequency. In terms of frequency, the spectrum begins at almost zero (0) and extends to infinity. In terms of wavelength, the spectrum begins at almost zero and extends to infinity, but in reverse.The portion of the spectrum currently usable for telecommunications includes electricity, radio, and infrared light. Table E-4 includes frequency band designations, nominal frequency ranges, nominal wavelengths, and example telecommunications applications. 1 k = kilo = 1,000 (1 thousand) 1 M = Mega = 1,000,000 (1 million) 1 G = Giga = 1,000,000,000 (1 billion) 1 T = Tera = 1,000,000,000,000 (1 trillion) 1 P = Peta = 1,000,000,000,000,000 (1 quadrillion) 1 E = Exa = 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1 quintillion) 2 km = kilometer (1,000 meters) 2 m = meter 2 cm = centimeter (1/100 meter) 2 mm = millimeter (1/1,000 meter) 2 µ = micron (1/1,000,000 meter) 2 nm = nanometer (1/1,000,000,000 meter) The wavelength figures assume transmission in a vacuum.Wavelength in a medium will be shorter due to the fact that the frequency remains the same while the signal propagates at speeds less than 300 km/s. For example, in glass the speed of light is reduced by the index of refraction, which is about 1.5 in practice, so the velocity of propagation (Vp) is approximately 200 km/s (300/1.5 = 200). Index of refraction (IOR) is the ratio of speed in a vacuum divided by speed in the medium. See also IOR, medium, vacuum, and Vp.

Webster's New World Telecom

The full range of electromagnetic energy that can be radiated, as defined by frequency (f), or wavelength , which is the inverse of frequency. In terms of frequency, the spectrum begins at almost zero (0) and extends to infinity. In terms of wavelength, the spectrum begins at almost zero and extends to infinity, but in reverse.The portion of the spectrum currently usable for telecommunications includes electricity, radio, and infrared light. Table E-4 includes frequency band designations, nominal frequency ranges, nominal wavelengths, and example telecommunications applications. 1 k = kilo = 1,000 (1 thousand) 1 M = Mega = 1,000,000 (1 million) 1 G = Giga = 1,000,000,000 (1 billion) 1 T = Tera = 1,000,000,000,000 (1 trillion) 1 P = Peta = 1,000,000,000,000,000 (1 quadrillion) 1 E = Exa = 1,000,000,000,000,000,000 (1 quintillion) 2 km = kilometer (1,000 meters) 2 m = meter 2 cm = centimeter (1/100 meter) 2 mm = millimeter (1/1,000 meter) 2 µ = micron (1/1,000,000 meter) 2 nm = nanometer (1/1,000,000,000 meter) The wavelength figures assume transmission in a vacuum.Wavelength in a medium will be shorter due to the fact that the frequency remains the same while the signal propagates at speeds less than 300 km/s. For example, in glass the speed of light is reduced by the index of refraction, which is about 1.5 in practice, so the velocity of propagation (Vp) is approximately 200 km/s (300/1.5 = 200). Index of refraction (IOR) is the ratio of speed in a vacuum divided by speed in the medium. See also IOR, medium, vacuum, and Vp.

Webster's New World Telecom

Other Word Forms of Electromagnetic-spectrum

Noun

Singular:
electromagnetic-spectrum
Plural:
electromagnetic-spectra
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