Electromagnetic-radiation definitions

Energy having both the form of electromagnetic waves and the form of a stream of photons and traveling at the speed of light in a vacuum. The entire range of frequencies and wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation makes up the electromagnetic spectrum.
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Energy in the form of transverse magnetic and electric waves. In a vacuum, these waves travel at the speed of light (which is itself a form of electromagnetic radiation). The acceleration of electric charges (such as alternating current in a radio transmitter) gives rise to electromagnetic radiation. Other common examples of electromagnetic radiation are x-rays, microwaves, and radio waves. A single unit, or quantum, of electromagnetic radiation is called a photon .
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The energy that radiates from all things in nature and from man-made electrical and electronic systems. Electromagnetic radiation includes cosmic rays, gamma rays, x-rays, ultraviolet light, visible light, infrared light, radar, microwaves, TV, radio, cellphones and all electronic transmission systems. Electromagnetic radiation is made up of an electromagnetic field (EMF), which comprises an electric field and a magnetic field that move at right angles to each other at the speed of light. See spectrum, microwave and electromagnetic hypersensitivity.
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Radiation (quantized as photons) consisting of oscillating electric and magnetic fields oriented perpendicularly to each other, moving through space.
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