Ebcdic definitions

ĕb'sē-dĭk
A standard code that uses 8 bits to represent each of up to 256 alphanumeric characters.
noun
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A standard computer code for the alphanumeric representation of data.
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An improvement over earlier (1950) Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) and (1951) Extended Binary Coded Decimal (Extended BCD), EBCDIC was developed by IBM in 1962 to enable different IBM computer systems to communicate based on a standard coding scheme, which users have the ability to modify. EBCDIC is an 8-bit coding scheme, yielding 2 8 (256) possible combinations. As a result, English and similarly complex alphabets can be supported, as can upper- and lowercase letters, a full range of numbers (0­9), and all necessary punctuation marks. EBCDIC also supports a large number of control characters, which is critical in the coordination of communications between the complex mainframe and midrange computers that were the core of IBM's business.Table E-1 of the EBCDIC code is based on a 0­255 scale in decimal notation (dec), and Table E-2 is based on 00­FF in the hexadecimal notation (hex). Although the full explanations of all control codes are outside the scope of this book, the following is a representative list: · NUL (NULl): A transmission control character used to serve a media-fill or time-fill requirement, i.e., a stuff character or padding character. · SOH (Start Of Header): A transmission-control character indicating the start of a message heading. · STX (Start of TeXt): A transmission-control character to start the reading, transmission, reception, or recording of text. · ETX (End of TeXt): A transmission-control character to terminate the reading, transmission, reception, or recording of text. · EOT (End Of Transmission): A transmission-control character to terminate a transmission that may have included one or more texts or messages. · ENQ (ENQuiry): A transmission-control character used to request a response from a station to which a connection has been established.The request may be for the station identification, type of equipment, and station status. · NAK (Negative AcKnowledgement): A transmission-control character sent by the receiving device to the transmitting device to indicate that a received block of data contained one or more errors. A NAK will trigger the transmitting device to retransmit that errored block. · ACK (ACKnowledgement): A transmission-control character sent by the receiving device to the transmitting device to indicate that a received block of data contained no errors. · BEL (BELl): A transmission-control character that causes a bell to ring or activates some other audio or visual device to gain the attention of the operator at the receiving station. · ETB (End of Transmission Block): A code-extension character used to indicate the end of the transmission of a block of data. · CAN (CANcel): A transmission-control character indicating that the associated data is in error or is to be ignored. · EM (End of Medium): The physical end of a data storage medium, or the usable portion of the medium. · SUB (SUBstitute): Used in place of a character that is known to be invalid, i.e., in error. Also used to indicate a character used in place of one that cannot be represented on a given device, e.g., e may be used in place of (epsilon) or d may be used in place of (delta). · ESC (ESCape): A code-extension character used to indicate a change in code interpretation to another character set, according to some convention or agreement.This is much like the use of the shift key in Baudot code to indicate a shift between figures and characters. · CR (Carriage Return): A format-control character that causes the print or display position to move to the first position, or left-hand margin, of the screen or print medium. · LF (Line Feed): A format-control character that moves the print position down to the next line. In Unicode terms, EBCDIC is known as Unicode Transformation Format-EBCDIC (UTF- EBCDIC). See also code set, decimal system, hexadecimal notation, and Unicode.
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(computing) Extended Binary-Coded-Decimal Interchange Code an 8-bit character set and encoding representing 256 alphanumeric and special characters.
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Origin of ebcdic

E(xtended) B(inary) C(oded) D(ecimal) I(nterchange) C(ode)