Dna meaning

dēĕn-ā
DNA, which stands for deoxyribonucleic acid, is defined as a nucleic acid that contains the genetic code.
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In 1928, Frederick Griffith realized that DNA might actually hold genetic information. In 1952, Alfred Hershey and Martha Chase performed an experiment which confirmed that DNA had a role in heredity.
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In 1869, the physician Friedrich Miescher first isolated DNA. While examining the substance of pus in surgical bandages, he observed a microscopic substance in the pus. He named it nuclein because he observed it in the nuclei of cells.
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The largest DNA polymer that is known is about two hundred and twenty million base pairs long.
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Short for deoxyribonucleic acid. The nucleic acid that is the genetic material determining the makeup of all living cells and many viruses. It consists of two long strands of nucleotides linked together in a structure resembling a ladder twisted into a spiral. In eukaryotic cells, the DNA is contained in the nucleus (where it is bound to proteins known as histones) and in mitochondria and chloroplasts. In the presence of the enzyme DNA polymerase and appropriate nucleotides, DNA can replicate itself. DNA also serves as a template for the synthesis of RNA in the presence of RNA polymerase.
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It was not until scientists used x-ray technology that they were to finally able to see the structure of a DNA molecule. In 1953 Rosalind Franklin was the first to take the most accurate picture, which became known as photograph 51, that truly defined the structure of the double helix shape of DNA.
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In 1962, the Nobel Peace Prize was given to James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins (an associate of Franklin who had died by 1962.).

An example of DNA is the chain of basic materials in the chromosomes of the human cell.

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A nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in cells and some viruses, consisting of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA sequences are replicated by the cell prior to cell division and may include genes, intergenic spacers, and regions that bind to regulatory proteins.
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Drugs 'n' alcohol.
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In 1953, James D. Watson and Francis Crick proposed the idea that the DNA’s structure was a double-helix.
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A nucleic acid that is bound in double helical chains by hydrogen bonds between the bases, generally found in the chromosomes of the cell nucleus but also found in the mitochondria: it contains the genetic code and transmits the hereditary pattern.
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A nucleic acid that carries the genetic information in cells and some viruses, consisting of two long chains of nucleotides twisted into a double helix and joined by hydrogen bonds between the complementary bases adenine and thymine or cytosine and guanine. DNA sequences are replicated by the cell prior to cell division and may include genes, intergenic spacers, and regions that bind to regulatory proteins.
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(1) See Windows DNA.
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Did Not Attend.
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(biochemistry) A biopolymer of deoxyribonucleic acids (a type of nucleic acid) that has four different chemical groups, called bases: adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine.
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(informal) That part of a person's character that has a genetic origin.
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Did Not Answer.
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Did Not Arrive (used when someone fails to keep an appointment).
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Do Not Assume.
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Defense Nuclear Agency.
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The Daugava (river in eastern Europe).
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It is a long polymer that is composed of repeating nucleotides.
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Figuratively, basic nature or qualities; makeup, constitution, essence, etc.
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Origin of dna

  • d(eoxyribo)n(ucleic) a(cid)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From German.

    From Wiktionary