Chromosome meaning

krō'mə-sōm'
The definition of a chromosome is a thread-like structure of DNA (nucleic acids and proteins) that carries genes.

The "X" or "Y" gene that determines whether you will be a boy or a girl is an example of a chromosome.

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A linear strand of DNA and associated proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells that carries the genes and functions in the transmission of hereditary information.
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A circular strand of DNA in bacteria and archaea that contains the hereditary information necessary for cell life.
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A linear strand of DNA and associated proteins in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells that carries the genes and functions in the transmission of hereditary information.
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A circular strand of DNA in bacteria and archaea that contains the hereditary information necessary for cell life.
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(biology, cytology) A structure in the cell nucleus that contains DNA, histone protein, and other structural proteins.

There have been documented cases of morphologically male transgenders having XX chromosomes.

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A structure in all living cells that consists of a single molecule of DNA bonded to various proteins and that carries the genes determining heredity. In all eukaryotic cells, the chromosomes occur as threadlike strands in the nucleus. During cell reproduction, these strands coil up and condense into much thicker structures that are easily viewed under a microscope. Chromosomes occur in pairs in all of the cells of eukaryotes except the reproductive cells, which have one of each chromosome, and some red blood cells (such as those of mammals) that expel their nuclei. In bacterial cells and other prokaryotes, which have no nucleus, the chromosome is a circular strand of DNA located in the cytoplasm.
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Any of the microscopic rod-shaped bodies formed by the incorporation of the chromatin in a cell nucleus during mitosis and meiosis: they carry the genes that convey hereditary characteristics, and are constant in number for each species.
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Origin of chromosome

  • 19th century: from German Chromosom, ultimately from Ancient Greek χρῶμα (khroma, “colour”) + σῶμα (sōma, “body”) (because they are stained under the microscope).
    From Wiktionary