Diphtheria meaning

dĭf-thîrē-ə, dĭp-
Diphtheria is defined as an infectious disease, caused by the bacteria corynebacterium diphtheriae, with a high fever, weakness and difficult breathing and swallowing.

An example of diphtheria is a condition you get when exposed to bacteria that makes it hard for you to swallow or breath.

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An acute infectious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae, characterized by the production of a systemic toxin and the formation of a false membrane on the lining of the mucous membrane of the throat and other respiratory passages, causing difficulty in breathing, high fever, and weakness. The toxin is particularly harmful to the tissues of the heart and central nervous system.
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An acute infectious disease caused by a bacterium (Corynebacterium diphtheriae) and characterized by weakness, high fever, the formation in the air passages of a tough, membranelike obstruction to breathing, and the production of a potent neurotoxin.
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An acute infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which infects mucous membranes of the throat, causing formation of a thick layer called the false membrane that can obstruct breathing, and producing a potent toxin that enters the bloodstream and causes systemic effects that include damage to the heart and nervous system.
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An infectious disease caused by the bacterium Corynebacterium diphtheriae and characterized by fever, swollen glands, and the formation of a membrane in the throat that prevents breathing. Infants are routinely vaccinated against diphtheria, which was once a common cause of death in children.
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(pathology) A highly infectious disease of the upper respiratory tract characterised by a sore throat, fever, and difficulty breathing, its symptoms being due to a potent toxin excreted by the infecting agent Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
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Origin of diphtheria

  • New Latin diphthēria from French diphthérie from Greek diphtherā piece of hide, leather letter

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French diphthérie, coined 1857 by Pierre Bretonneau; from Ancient Greek διφθέρα (diphthera, “prepared hide, leather”), for the tough membrane that forms in the throat. Bretonneau earlier used diphthérite, from which diphtheritis.

    From Wiktionary