Diffraction-grating meaning

A polished surface, usually glass or metal, having a large number of very fine parallel grooves or slits, and used to produce optical spectra by diffraction of reflected or transmitted light.
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(optics) A plate of glass or polished metal ruled with a series of very close, equidistant, parallel lines, used to produce a spectrum by the diffraction of reflected or transmitted light.
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A polished surface, often of glass or metal, having many fine parallel stripes or slits through which radiation such as light is passed and projected onto a screen or other detection device. The interference patterns cast by the diffraction grating on the screen or detector can be analyzed to determine the frequency of the radiation.
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A device that breaks up an electromagnetic wave into its different frequencies (wavelengths) by scattering them at different angles. For example, a series of thousands of scored lines in a glass plate diffracts light into a rainbow of colors. Lines of data pits on a CD give the same effect. See diffraction.
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An optical device comprising a set of fine parallel slits or grooves etched onto a material in order to product interference patterns that separate components of a spectrum of incoming light. The fundamental principle is that different wavelengths diffract to different extents, so they can be separated much as a prism separates a composite polychromatic incident light beam into its constituent wavelengths of light. Human beings see this as the separation of white light into a rainbow of colored light. There are two types of diffraction gratings.
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(physics) A surface having a large number of closely spaced lines or slits; used to produce optical spectra by mutual interference.
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