Decadence definition

dĕkə-dəns, dĭ-kādns
A process, condition, or period of deterioration or decline, as in morals or art; decay.
noun
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Lavish or sensual self-indulgence.
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Decadence is defined as behavior that shows a love of self-indulgence, pleasure and money, or the process of decline or decay in society's ethical and moral traditions.

An example of decadence is a dessert bar with hundreds of choices of chocolate desserts.

An example of decadence is the Decadent movement in the late 19th century when artists and writers such as Oscar Wilde moved away from the Romantic ethical view to a more dishonest behavior reflecting a decline in moral behavior.

noun
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A literary movement especially of late 19th-century France and England characterized by refined aestheticism, artifice, and the quest for new sensations.
noun
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A process, condition, or period of decline, as in morals, art, literature, etc.; deterioration; decay.
noun
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2
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
decadence
Plural:
decadences

Origin of decadence

  • French décadence from Old French decadence from Medieval Latin dēcadentia a decaying, declining from Vulgar Latin dēcadere to decay decay

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From French décadence, from Medieval Latin decadentia (“decay”), from *decadens (“decaying”), present participle of *decadere (“to decay”); see decay.

    From Wiktionary