Cursor meaning

kûr'sər
A movable indicator on a display, marking a position where typed characters will appear or where an option can be selected.
noun
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(1) The symbol used to point to some element on screen. On Windows, Mac and other graphics-based screens, it is also called a "pointer," and it changes shape as it is moved with the mouse into different areas of the application. For example, it may turn into an I-beam for editing text, an arrow for selecting menus or a pen for drawing.On DOS and Unix command lines as well as other character-based screens, the cursor may be a rectangle, an underline or a vertical line, and it is typically blinking. See database cursor.
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A part of any of several scientific instruments that moves back and forth to indicate a position.
noun
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(graphical user interface) A moving icon or other representation of the position of the pointing device.
noun
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(graphical user interface) An indicator, often a blinking line or bar, indicating where the next insertion or other edit will take place. Also referred to as "the caret".
noun
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(databases) A reference to a row of data in a table, which moves from row to row as data is retrieved by way of it.
noun
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(programming) A design pattern in object oriented methodology in which a collection is iterated uniformly, also known as the iterator pattern.
noun
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(intransitive, computing) To navigate by means of the cursor keys.
verb
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On a computer screen, a movable indicator, such as an underline, a stylized figure, or a spot of highlighting, that indicates one's current interactive position within the display, as where in text a typed keystroke would appear, which icon would be affected by a click of the mouse, etc.
noun
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Origin of cursor

  • Middle English runner from Latin from cursus past participle of currere to run kers- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Latin cursor (“runner”), from currō (“run”) + -or (“agentive suffix”). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European.
    From Wiktionary