Croup meaning

kro͝op
The top of the rump of a horse, dog, etc., just behind the loin.
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A pathological condition of the larynx, especially in infants and children, that is characterized by respiratory difficulty and a hoarse, brassy cough.
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The rump of a beast of burden, especially a horse.
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A condition resulting from any obstruction of the larynx, esp. an inflammation of the respiratory passages, with labored breathing, sharp and abrupt coughing, and laryngeal spasm.
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A pathological condition of the larynx, especially in infants and children, that is characterized by respiratory difficulty and a hoarse, brassy cough.
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The rump of a beast of burden, especially a horse.
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An acute infection that affects the upper and lower respiratory tracts, especially the larynx, trachea, and bronchi, and is caused most commonly by viruses of the genus Paramyxovirus. It is characterized by labored breathing and obstruction below the glottis, accompanied by a barking cough.
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The top of the rump of a horse.
noun
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(obsolete except dialectal) To croak, make a hoarse noise.
verb
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(pathology) An infectious illness of the larynx, especially in young children, causing respiratory difficulty.
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Origin of croup

  • Middle English croupe from Old French of Germanic origin

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From dialectal croup to croak

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Scots croup, croop (“the croup”), from Scots croup, crowp, croop (“to croak, speak hoarsely, murmur, complain”), from Old Scots crowp, crope, croap (“to call loudly, croak”), alteration of rowp, roup, roip, rope (“to cry, cry hoarsely, roop”), from Middle English roupen, ropen, from Old English hrōpan (“to shout, proclaim; cry out, scream, howl”), from Proto-Germanic *hrōpaną (“to shout”), from Proto-Indo-European *ker-, *kor- (“to caw, crow”). More at roop.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Middle English croupe, from Old French croupe (“rump, body”), from Old Norse kroppr (“body, trunk, mass”), from Proto-Germanic *kruppaz (“body, mass, heap, collection, crop”), from Proto-Indo-European *grewb- (“to curve, bend, crawl”). More at group, crop.

    From Wiktionary