Credence definition

krēdns
Recommendation; credentials.

A letter of credence.

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Belief, esp. in the reports or testimony of another.

To give credence to rumors.

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The definition of credence is the probability or chance that something is true, or to the belief that something is true.

An example of credence is when a scientific experiment has revealed the same findings when conducted by several different scientists, thus creating a high probability that the findings are true.

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Acceptance as true or valid; belief.

I wouldn't put too much credence in that story.

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Credibility; plausibility.
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Credentials.
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(religion) A small table or credenza used in certain Christian religious services.
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(obsolete) To give credence to; to believe.
verb
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A small table or shelf for holding the bread, wine, and vessels of the Eucharist when they are not in use at the altar.
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(eccles.) A small table at the side of the altar for the bread, wine, etc. used in the Eucharistic service.
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Acceptance of a belief or claim as true, especially on the basis of evidence.

Based on the scientific data, I give credence to this hypothesis.

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(rare) Credential or supporting material for a person or claim.

He presented us with a letter of credence.

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A cupboard, sideboard, or cabinet, particularly one intended for the display of rich vessels or plate on open shelves.
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Origin of credence

  • Middle English from Old French from Medieval Latin crēdentia from Latin crēdēns crēdent- present participle of crēdere to believe kerd- in Indo-European roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French credence, from Medieval Latin crēdentia (“belief, faith”), from Latin crēdēns, present active participle of crēdō (“loan, confide in, trust, believe”).

    From Wiktionary