Cockle meaning

kŏkəl
Any of various chiefly marine bivalve mollusks of the family Cardiidae, having rounded or heart-shaped shells with radiating ribs.
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The shell of a cockle.
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A wrinkle; a pucker.
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A cockleshell.
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To become or cause to become wrinkled or puckered.
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Any of several weedy plants, especially the corn cockle.
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Any of a family (Cardiidae) of edible, marine bivalve mollusks with two heart-shaped, radially ridged shells.
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A cockleshell.
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A wrinkle; pucker.
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To wrinkle; pucker.
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Any of various weeds that grow in grainfields, as the corn cockle.
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The shell of such a mollusk.
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(in the plural) One’s innermost feelings (only in the expression “the cockles of one’s heart”).
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(directly from French coquille) A wrinkle, pucker.
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(by extension) A defect in sheepskin; firm dark nodules caused by the bites of keds on live sheep.
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(mining, UK, Cornish) The mineral black tourmaline or schorl.

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(UK) The fire chamber of a furnace.

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(UK) A kiln for drying hops; an oast.

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(UK) The dome of a heating furnace.

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To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting; to pucker.
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Any of several field weeds, such as the corncockle, Agrostemma githago, and Lolium temulentum.
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cockles of (one's) heart
  • One's innermost feelings:.
    The valentine warmed the cockles of my heart.
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warm the cockles of someone's heart
  • To make someone feel pleased or cheerful.
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Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

cockles of (one's) heart

Origin of cockle

  • Middle English cokel from Old French coquille shell from Vulgar Latin cochillia from Latin conchyllium from Greek konkhulion diminutive of konkhē mussel

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English cokkel from Old English coccel from Medieval Latin cocculus diminutive of Latin coccus kermes berry from Greek kokkos

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French coquille, from Vulgar Latin *cocchilia, form of Latin conchylia, from Ancient Greek κογχύλιον (konkhulion), diminutive of κογχύλη (konkhulē, “mussel”), from Proto-Indo-European *konkho.

    From Wiktionary

  • From Old English coccel, perhaps from a diminutive of Latin coccus (“berry”)

    From Wiktionary