Cobalt meaning

kō'bôlt'
A hard, brittle metallic element, found associated with nickel, silver, lead, copper, and iron ores and resembling nickel and iron in appearance. It is used chiefly for magnetic alloys, high-temperature alloys, and in the form of its salts for blue glass and ceramic pigments. Atomic number 27; atomic weight 58.9332; melting point 1,495°C; boiling point 2,927°C; specific gravity 8.9; valence 2, 3.
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A chemical element (symbol Co) with an atomic number of 27.
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A radioactive isotope of cobalt with mass number 60 and exceptionally intense gamma-ray activity, used in radiotherapy, metallurgy, and materials testing.
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A hard, lustrous, steel-gray, ductile, metallic chemical element, found in various ores: it is used in the preparation of magnetic, wear-resistant, and high-strength alloys: its compounds are used in the production of inks, paints, and varnishes: symbol, Co; at. no. 27: a radioactive isotope (cobalt-60) is used in the treatment of cancer, in research, etc.
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Cobalt blue.
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A village in Connecticut.
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An unincorporated community in Idaho.
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A silvery-white, hard, brittle metallic element that occurs widely in metal ores. It is used to make magnetic alloys, heat-resistant alloys, and blue pigment for ceramics and glass. Atomic number 27; atomic weight 58.9332; melting point 1,495°C; boiling point 2,900°C; specific gravity 8.9; valence 2, 3.
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Origin of cobalt

  • German Kobalt from Middle High German kobolt variant of kobold goblin (from silver miners' belief that cobalt had been placed by goblins who had stolen the silver) kobold
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From German Kobold (“goblin”), from Middle High German (see Kobold for more).
    From Wiktionary