Byssus definitions

bĭs'əs
A mass of strong, silky filaments by which certain bivalve mollusks, such as mussels, attach themselves to rocks and other fixed surfaces.
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A fine-textured linen of ancient times, used by the Egyptians for wrapping mummies.
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A fine fabric, esp. a linen cloth, used by the ancients, as in Egypt for mummy wrapping.
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A tuft of filaments, chemically similar to silk, secreted by various marine bivalves, esp. the mussels, and used to attach the mollusk to the substratum.
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An exceptionally fine and valuable fibre or cloth of ancient times. Originally used for fine flax and linens, its use was later extended to fine cottons, silks, and sea silk.
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The long fine silky filaments excreted by several mollusks (particularly Pinna nobilis) by which they attach themselves to the sea bed, and from which sea silk is manufactured.
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(mycology) The stipe or stem of some fungi which are particularly thin and thread-like.
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Origin of byssus

From New Latin byssus (“sea silk”), from Latin byssus (“fine cotton or cotton stuff, silk”), from Ancient Greek βύσσος (bussos, “a very fine yellowish flax and the linen woven from it”), from Hebrew בּוּץ (búts), Aramaic בּוש (bus).