Baud meaning

bôd
A unit of data transfer speed equal to one change in a carrier signal per second. Since most data transmission schemes transfer more than one bit of data with each change in the carrier signal, one baud is usually equal to several bits per second.
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A unit of signaling speed in telegraphic code.
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The signaling rate of a line, which is the number of transitions (voltage or frequency changes) that are created per second. The term has often been erroneously used to specify bits per second (bps). However, only at very low speeds is baud equal to bps; for example, 300 baud is the same as 300 bps. Beyond that, one baud can be made to represent more than one bit. For example, a V.22bis modem generates 1,200 bps at 600 baud. See baudot code, baud barf and modem.
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A signal event, signal change, or signal transition, such as a change from positive voltage to zero voltage, from zero voltage to negative voltage, or from positive voltage to negative voltage. The baud is named for Emile Baudot, inventor of the teletype. See also Baudot code and baud rate.
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(computing, telecommunications) A rate defined as the number of signalling events per second in a data transmission.
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(computing, informal) Synonym for bps (bits per second), regardless of how many signalling events are necessary to signal each bit.
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Origin of baud

  • After Jean Maurice Emile Baudot (1845–1903), French engineer

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Borrowing from French baud. Named for French inventor Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot (1845-1903).

    From Wiktionary