Artifact meaning

ärtə-făkt
Frequency:
An inaccurate observation, effect, or result, especially one resulting from the technology used in scientific investigation or from experimental error.

The apparent pattern in the data was an artifact of the collection method.

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The definition of an artifact is something made by humans and often is a primitive tool, structure, or part of a functional item.

An example of an artifact would be a cooking pot found by archaeologists that Ancient Romans might have used.

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Something viewed as a product of human conception or agency rather than an inherent element.
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A phenomenon or feature not originally present or expected and caused by an interfering external agent, action, or process, as an unwanted feature in a microscopic specimen after fixation, in a digitally reproduced image, or in a digital audio recording.
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An object produced or shaped by human craft, especially a tool, weapon, or ornament of archaeological or historical interest.
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Any object made by human work; esp., a simple or primitive tool, weapon, vessel, etc.
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Any nonnatural feature or structure accidentally introduced into something being observed or studied.
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A phenomenon or feature not originally present or expected and caused by an interfering external agent, action, or process, as an unwanted feature in a microscopic specimen after fixation, in a digitally reproduced image, or in a digital audio recording.
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An inaccurate observation, effect, or result, especially one resulting from the technology used in scientific investigation or from experimental error.

The apparent pattern in the data was an artifact of the collection method.

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An object produced or shaped by human craft, especially a tool, weapon, or ornament of archaeological or historical interest.
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(1) Any element in a software development project. It includes documentation, test plans, images, data files and executable modules.
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An artificial product or effect observed in a natural system, especially one introduced by the technology used in scientific investigation or by experimental error.
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Unintended and unwanted distortions or other aberrations in reproduced audio or video due to transmission errors or signal processing operations. Artifacts often result from the use of lossy compression algorithms at high compression ratios. Artifacts in video images can manifest as jagged blockings or a tiling effect known as aliasing, banding of colors, white spots, and even dropped frames. See also aliasing, compression, distortion, lossy compression, and signal.
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An object made or shaped by human hand.
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(archaeology) An object, such as a tool, weapon or ornament, of archaeological or historical interest, especially such an object found at an archaeological excavation.

The dig produced many Roman artifacts.

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Something viewed as a product of human conception or agency rather than an inherent element.
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A structure or finding in an experiment or investigation that is not a true feature of the object under observation, but is a result of external action, the test arrangement, or an experimental error.

The spot on his lung turned out to be an artifact of the X-ray process.

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An object made or shaped by some agent or intelligence, not necessarily of direct human origin.
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(computing) A perceptible distortion that appears in a digital image, audio or video file as a result of applying a lossy compression algorithm.

This JPEG image has been so highly compressed that it has too many unsightly compression artifacts, making it unsuitable for the cover of our magazine.

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Origin of artifact

  • Latin arte ablative of ars art art1 factum something made (from) (neuter past participle of facere to make dhē- in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Alteration of artefact, from Italian artefatto, from Latin arte (“by skill”), (ablative of ars (“art”)) + factum (“thing made”), from facere

    From Wiktionary