Abound meaning

ə-bound
(intransitive) To be present or available in large numbers; to be plentiful. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]

Wild animals abound wherever man does not stake his claim.

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The definition of abound means to have a large amount of something.

An example of abound is to collect a great many collectible stamps or other items.

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(intransitive) To be full to overflowing. [First attested from around (1350 to 1470).]
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To be great in number or amount.
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To have something in great numbers or amounts. Often used with in or with .
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To be plentiful; exist in large numbers or amounts.

Tropical plants abound in the jungle.

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To have plenty; be filled; be wealthy (in) or teem (with)

A land that abounds in grain, woods that abound with game.

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(intransitive) To be highly productive.
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(intransitive) To revel in. [Attested from around (1350 to 1470) until the late 18th century.]
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(intransitive) To be copiously supplied;

The wilderness abounds in traps.

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Abound means to have many of something.

An example of something that abounds is children in a pool on a hot summer day.

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Origin of abound

  • Middle English abounden from Old French abonder from Latin abundāre to overflow ab- away ab–1 undāre to flow (from unda wave wed-1 in Indo-European roots)

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English abounden, abounde, from Old French abonder, abunder, from Latin abundāre, present active infinitive of abundō (“overflow”), which comes from ab (“from, down from”) + undō (“surge, swell, rise in waves, move in waves”), from unda (“wave”).

    From Wiktionary

  • First attested around 1325.

    From Wiktionary