Yttrium meaning

ĭtrē-əm
A silvery metallic element, not a rare earth but occurring in nearly all rare-earth minerals, used in various metallurgical applications, notably to increase the strength of magnesium and aluminum alloys. Its oxide and other compounds are useful as phosphors, microwave filters, laser dopants, and superconducting materials. Atomic number 39; atomic weight 88.906; melting point 1,522°C; boiling point 3,345°C; specific gravity 4.469 (at 25°C); valence 3.
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A rare, trivalent, silvery, metallic chemical element found in combination in gadolinite, monazite sand, samarskite, etc.: used in phosphors, alloys, etc.: symbol, Y; at. no. 39
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A silvery metallic element found in the same ores as elements of the lanthanide series. Yttrium is used to strengthen magnesium and aluminum alloys, to provide the red color in color televisions, and as a component of various optical and electronic devices. Atomic number 39; atomic weight 88.906; melting point 1,522°C; boiling point 3,338°C; specific gravity 4.45 (25°C); valence 3.
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A rare trivalent, silvery, metallic chemical element used in various alloys and to make the red color phosphors in cathode ray tubes (CRTs).Yttrium also is used in YAG/LED (Yttrium Aluminum Garnet/Light-Emitting Diode) light sources. Number 39 in the Periodic Table of Elements, yttrium is named for the village of Ytterby, Sweden, where it was discovered. So were erbium, ytterbium, and terbium. See also erbium, LED, television, YAG/LED, and Ytterby.
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A metallic chemical element (symbol Y) with an atomic number of 39.
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Origin of yttrium

  • From yttria

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Ytterby, (literally, "outer village") a town in Sweden.

    From Wiktionary