Yew meaning

yo͝o
Frequency:
Designating a family (Taxaceae) of resinous evergreen conifers with needlelike leaves, including ground hemlock.
adjective
1
0
Any of several poisonous evergreen coniferous trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, having scarlet cup-shaped arils and flat needles that are dark green above and yellowish below. Yews contain compounds used in medicine and are often grown as ornamentals.
noun
1
0
(countable) A species of coniferous tree, Taxus baccata, with dark-green flat needle-like leaves and seeds bearing red arils, native to western, central and southern Europe, northwest Africa, northern Iran and southwest Asia.
noun
1
0
(countable, by extension) Any tree or shrub of the genus Taxus.
noun
1
0
(uncountable) The wood of the yew.
noun
1
0
Advertisement
A bow for archery, made of yew wood.
noun
1
0
Made from the wood of the yew tree.
adjective
1
0
Any of several poisonous evergreen coniferous trees or shrubs of the genus Taxus, having scarlet cup-shaped arils and flat needles that are dark green above and yellowish below. Yews contain compounds used in medicine and are often grown as ornamentals.
noun
0
0
The wood of any of these trees, especially the durable, fine-grained wood of the Eurasian and North African species Taxus baccata, used in cabinetmaking and for archery bows.
noun
0
0
An archer's bow of yew.
noun
0
0
Advertisement

Origin of yew

  • Middle English from Old English īw

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Middle English ew, from Old English Ä«w, Ä“ow, from Proto-Germanic *Ä«waz, *Ä«hwaz (compare Icelandic ýr), masculine variant of *Ä«wō (compare Dutch ijf, German Eibe), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eiH-u̯ehâ‚‚ (compare Hittite [script?] (eja, “type of evergreen"), Welsh yw (“yews"), Lithuanian ievà (“bird cherry"), Russian ива (íva, “willow")).

    From Wiktionary