Visual meaning

vĭzho͝o-əl
The definition of a visual is a film clip or image used to illustrate a story or a message.

An example of a visual is the short clip from an old news broadcast.

noun
37
6
A picture, chart, or other presentation that appeals to the sense of sight, used in promotion or for illustration or narration.

An ad campaign with striking visuals; trying to capture a poem in a cinematic visual.

noun
17
8
Of, having the nature of, or occurring as a mental image, or vision.
adjective
12
6
Visual describes something that is seen.

An example of visual used as an adjective is a visual presentation with moving images and pictures.

adjective
12
7
Optical.
adjective
11
7
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Having the nature of or producing an image in the mind.

A visual memory of the scene.

adjective
6
2
Done, maintained, or executed by sight only.

Visual navigation.

adjective
5
0
Seen or able to be seen by the eye; visible.

A visual presentation; a design with a dramatic visual effect.

adjective
4
1
Of or relating to a method of instruction involving sight.
adjective
3
0
adjective
3
0
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Related to or affecting the vision.
adjective
3
0
Of or relating to the sense of sight.

A visual organ; visual receptors on the retina.

adjective
3
1
That is or can be seen; visible.
adjective
2
0
A film clip, still photograph, etc. as used in a documentary film, TV news broadcast, etc.
noun
2
0
noun
2
0
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Any element of something that depends on sight.
noun
1
0
(in the plural) All the visual elements of a multi-media presentation or entertainment, usually in contrast with normal text or audio.
noun
1
0
(advertising) A preliminary sketch.
noun
1
0
The visual elements of a film, TV presentation, etc., as distinct from the accompanying sound.
noun
1
1

Origin of visual

  • Middle English from Late Latin vīsuālis from Latin vīsus sight from past participle of vidēre to see vision

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • From Old French, from Late Latin visualis (“of sight"), from Latin visus (“sight"), from videre (“to see"), past participle visus; see visage.

    From Wiktionary