Viola meaning

vē-ō'lə
A stringed instrument of the violin family, slightly larger than a violin, tuned a fifth lower, and having a deeper, more sonorous tone.
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An organ stop usually of eight-foot or four-foot pitch yielding stringlike tones.
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A stringed instrument of the violin family, slightly larger than a violin, tuned a fifth lower, and having a deeper, more sonorous tone.
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An organ stop usually of eight-foot or four-foot pitch yielding stringlike tones.
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Any of various plants of the genus Viola, which includes the violets and pansies, especially certain ornamental varieties that are usually more compact than pansies and have smaller flowers without a blotch on the petals.
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Any of various plants of the genus Viola, which includes the violets and pansies, especially certain ornamental varieties that are usually more compact than pansies and have smaller flowers without a blotch on the petals.
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A stringed instrument of the violin family, slightly larger than a violin and tuned a fifth lower.
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A violet; esp., any of various violets developed from a pansy (Viola cornuta), grown as garden plants.
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A feminine name: dim. Vi.
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(music) A stringed instrument of the violin family, somewhat larger than a violin, played under the chin, and having a deeper tone.
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(music) An organ stop having a similar tone.
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(music) A 10-string steel-string acoustic guitar, used in Brazilian folk music.
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(botany) Any of several flowering plants, of the genus Viola, including the violets and pansies.
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A female given name.
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A town in Arkansas.
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A town in Delaware.
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A village in Illinois.
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A city in Kansas.
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A hamlet in New York.
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A town in Tennessee.
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A village in Wisconsin.
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Origin of viola

  • Italian from Old Italian from Old Provençal a kind of early viol ultimately of imitative origin (probably back formation from violar to play the viol) (from viu sound imitative of a hurdy-gurdy or viol)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Italian from Old Italian from Old Provençal a kind of early viol ultimately of imitative origin (probably back formation from violar to play the viol) (from viu sound imitative of a hurdy-gurdy or viol)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Latin Greek ion (both Greek and Latin from a common unknown Mediterranean source)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Latin Greek ion (both Greek and Latin from a common unknown Mediterranean source)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Italian viola, from Old Provençal viola (modern Occitan viula), from Medieval Latin *vitula (“stringed instrument").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin viola (“violet").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin viola (“violet")
    From Wiktionary