Veronica meaning

və-rŏn'ĭ-kə
A cloth bearing a representation of Jesus's face.
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A maneuver in bullfighting in which the matador stands with both feet fixed in position and swings the cape slowly away from the charging bull.
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In Christian tradition, a woman of Jerusalem who gave Jesus her head cloth to wipe his face as he bore the cross to Calvary.
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A feminine name.
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According to Christian tradition, a woman of Jerusalem who wiped the bleeding face of Jesus on the way to Calvary: her day is July 12
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A bullfighting move in which the matador holds a cape out and pivots slowly as the bull charges past it.
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A program that searches the Internet for specific resources by description, not just file name. Using Boolean searches (this AND this, this OR this, etc.), users can search Gopher servers to retrieve a selected group of menus that pertain to their area of interest. See Gopher.
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A variation on the Archie Internet browser that searches Gopherspace titles and creates a menu with the results of the search. See also Archie, browser, Gopher, Gopherspace, Internet, and JUGHEAD.
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(Roman Catholicism) The image of Jesus's face believed to have been made on the cloth with which St Veronica wiped his face as he went to be crucified; or the cloth used for this.
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(bullfighting) A circular swinging movement of the cape, used to avoid the bull.
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(botany) A flower of the genus Veronica, usually having blue petals.
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A female given name.
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Origin of veronica

  • Medieval Latin perhaps alteration of vēra īconica true image Latin vēra feminine of vērus true very Latin īconica feminine of īconicus of an image (from Greek eikonikos) (from eikōn image icon)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Spanish from veronica the veronica (from the gesture Saint Veronica made) from Medieval Latin veronica2
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • New Latin Veronica genus name
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Latin form of Berenice, from Ancient Greek Φερενίκη. Influenced by the Church Latin phrase vera icon "true image" associated with the legend of Saint Veronica who wiped the face of Jesus on the way to Calvary.
    From Wiktionary
  • Named from St. Veronica.
    From Wiktionary