Tungsten meaning

tŭng'stən
A hard, gray to white metallic element that is very resistant to corrosion. It has the highest melting point of all elements, and it retains its strength at high temperatures. It is used to make light-bulb filaments and to increase the hardness and strength of steel. Atomic number 74; atomic weight 183.84; melting point 3,410°C; boiling point 5,900°C; specific gravity 19.3 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.
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A hard, brittle, corrosion-resistant, gray to white metallic element extracted from wolframite, scheelite, and other minerals, having the highest melting point and lowest vapor pressure of any metal. Tungsten and its alloys are used in high-temperature structural materials and wear-resistant tools and machine parts; in electrical elements, notably lamp filaments; and in instruments requiring thermally compatible glass-to-metal seals. Atomic number 74; atomic weight 183.84; melting point 3,422°C; boiling point 5,555°C; specific gravity 19.3 (20°C); valence 2, 3, 4, 5, 6.
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A hard, heavy, gray-white, metallic chemical element, found in wolframite, scheelite, tungstite, etc., and used in steel for high-speed tools, in electric contact points and lamp filaments, etc.: symbol, W; at. no. 74
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A natural hard metal that has the highest melting point of any pure chemical element. It was first used as a filament in incandescent bulbs in the early 20th century. See color temperature.
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A metallic chemical element (symbol W) with an atomic number of 74. The symbol is derived from the Latin word wolframium.
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A light bulb containing tungsten.
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(mineralogy) Scheelite, or calcium tungstate.
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Origin of tungsten

  • Swedish tung heavy (from Old Norse thungr) sten stone (from Old Norse steinn stāi- in Indo-European roots)
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Swedish and Danish tung (“heavy") + sten (“stone") (although neither language uses "tungsten" as the name of the element)
    From Wiktionary