Calcium definitions

kăl'sē-əm
The definition of calcium is the fifth most abundant element in the human body.
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Calcium is is the fifth most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust, found in the form of a compound or a salt.
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Limestone and granite are forms of calcium carbonate.
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Calcium carbonate is the salt that makes hard water.
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Calcium serves many functions in the body including the construction of bones and teeth.
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Nutritional sources of calcium include: Cow’s milk, cheese, kelp, beans, oranges and broccoli.

An example of calcium is the mineral found in dairy products.

An example of calcium is chalk which is made of calcium carbonate.

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A silvery, moderately hard alkaline-earth metal that constitutes approximately 3.6 percent of the earth's crust and is a basic component of most animals and plants. It occurs naturally in limestone, gypsum, and fluorite, and its compounds are used to make plaster, quicklime, Portland cement, and metallurgic and electronic materials. Atomic number 20; atomic weight 40.08; melting point 842°C; boiling point 1,484°C; specific gravity 1.54; valence 2.
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A soft, silver-white, metallic chemical element, one of the alkaline-earth metals, found in limestone, marble, chalk, etc., always in combination: it is used as a reducing agent and in fertilizer, and is the essential part of bones, shells, and teeth: symbol, Ca; at. no. 20
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A silvery-white, moderately hard metallic element of the alkaline-earth group that occurs in limestone and gypsum. It is a basic component of leaves, bones, teeth, and shells, and is essential for the normal growth and development of most animals and plants. Calcium is used to make plaster, cement, and alloys. Atomic number 20; atomic weight 40.08; melting point 842 to 848°C; boiling point 1,487°C; specific gravity 1.55; valence 2.
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A chemical element, atomic number 20, that is an alkaline earth metal and occurs naturally as carbonate in limestone and as silicate in many rocks.
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(countable) An atom of this element.
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Origin of calcium

A New Latin word derived by Sir Humphry Davy in 1808, from Latin calx ("lime", "limestone") because it occurs in limestone.