Transposon definition

trăns-pōzŏn
Frequency:
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid.
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A segment of DNA that moves to a new location in a chromosome, or to another chromosome or cell, and alters the existing genetic instructions, sometimes producing significant changes.
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A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid.
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A segment of DNA that is capable of independently replicating itself and inserting the copy into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Transposons act somewhat similarly to viruses and in humans are an underlying cause of hemophilia, certain cancers, and other diseases. In other organisms, they can become a permanent and even beneficial part of the genome, as in maize corn, where transposons account for half the genome, and certain bacteria, where genes for antibiotic resistance can spread by means of transposons.
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(genetics) A segment of DNA that can move to a different position within a genome.
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Other Word Forms

Noun

Singular:
transposon
Plural:
transposons

Origin of transposon

  • transpos(ition) –on

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition