Temple meaning

tĕm'pəl
The definition of a temple is the flat area on the side of the head, in front of each ear.

An example of the temple is the area to rub when someone has a tension headache.

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A building used for meetings by any of several fraternal orders, especially the Knights Templars.
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A building reserved for a highly valued function.

The library, a temple of learning.

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Either of two groups of buildings in London, the Inner Temple and the Middle Temple, that house two of the four Inns of Court and that occupy the site of the medieval Knights Templars establishment.
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A church.
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Temple is defined as a place where people worship.

An example of a temple is a synagogue.

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Something regarded as having within it a divine presence.
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Either of two sets (placeproperInner Temple and properplaceMiddle Temple) of London buildings housing two of England's four principal law societies: their site was formerly occupied by the London branch of the Knights Templars.
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Either of the sidepieces of a pair of glasses that fit across the temples and over the ears.
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A device for keeping the cloth in a loom stretched to its correct width.
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1928-2014; U.S. child film actress.
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1628-99; Brit. diplomat & writer.
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The flat region on either side of the forehead.
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Either of the sidepieces of a frame for eyeglasses that extends along the temple and over the ear.
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A device in a loom that keeps the cloth stretched to the correct width during weaving.
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A building, usually of imposing size, etc., serving the public or an organization in some special way.

A temple of art, a Masonic temple.

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Either of the flat surfaces alongside the forehead, in front of each ear.
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The flat region on either side of the forehead.
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Either of the sidepieces of a frame for eyeglasses that extends along the temple and over the ear.
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A building for worship.

The temple of Zeus was very large.

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(often capitalized) The Jewish temple of Jerusalem, first built by Solomon.
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Something regarded as holding religious presence.
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Something of importance; something attended to.

My body is my temple.

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Hands held together with forefingers outstretched and touching pad to pad, with the rest of the fingers clasped.
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To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to.

To temple a god.

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(anatomy) The slightly flatter region, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.
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(ophthalmology) Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning down around them.
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(weaving) A contrivance used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.
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A male given name.
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A female given name.
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A village in Cornwall.
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A city in Georgia, USA.
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A town in Maine.
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A town in New Hampshire.
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A town in Oklahoma.
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A village and parish in Scotland.
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A city in Texas.
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Origin of temple

  • Middle English tempille from Old French temple possibly from Latin templum small piece of timber tem- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old French from Vulgar Latin tempula from Latin tempora pl. of tempus temple of the head
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English from Old English tempel from Latin templum tem- in Indo-European roots
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • From Middle English temple, from Old French temple, from Latin tempora (“the temples"), plural of tempus (“temple, head, face") (see "temporal bone")
    From Wiktionary
  • From Middle English temple, from Old English templ, from Latin templum (“shrine, temple, area for auspices").
    From Wiktionary
  • From Latin templum (“a small timber, a purlin"); compare templet and template.
    From Wiktionary