Tare meaning

târ
Tare is defined as the weight of a container before it is filled or loaded.

An example of tare is the weight of an empty shampoo bottle before it has been refilled.

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The definition of a tare is a hardy, weedy nitrogen-fixing plant with colored flowers.

An example of a tare is the common vetch.

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An unwelcome or objectionable element.
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Any of several vetches native to Europe.
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The weight of a container or wrapper that is deducted from the gross weight to obtain net weight.
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A deduction from gross weight made to allow for the weight of a container.
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A counterbalance, especially an empty vessel used to counterbalance the weight of a similar container.
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To determine or indicate the tare of, especially to weigh in order to find out the tare.
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Any of several vetches, esp. the common vetch (Vicia sativa)
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The seed of any of these plants.
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A noxious weed, thought to be darnel: Matt. 13:25-40
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The weight of a container, wrapper, vehicle, etc. deducted from the total weight to determine the weight of the contents or load.
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The deduction of this.
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To find out, allow for, or mark the tare of.
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(rare) A vetch, or the seed of a vetch.
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(rare) A damaging weed growing in fields of grain.
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The empty weight of a container.
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(chiefly business and law) To take into account the weight of the container, wrapping etc. in weighting merchandise.
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(sciences) To set a zero value on an instrument (usually a balance) that discounts the starting point.
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(obsolete) Simple past tense of tear.
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Any of several weedy plants that grow in grain fields.
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Origin of tare

  • Middle English from Old French ultimately from Arabic ṭarḥ rejection, subtraction from ṭaraḥa to throw away ṭrḥ in Semitic roots

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English

    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition

  • Middle English tare (“vetch"), from Proto-Germanic *tarwō (cf. Dutch tarwe (“wheat")), from Proto-Indo-European *drÌ¥Hu̯ā (cf. Welsh drewg (“darnel"), Lithuanian dirvà (“field"), Ancient Greek δάρατος (dáratos, “bread"), Sanskrit दूर्वा (dÅ«rvā, “panic grass, millet")).

    From Wiktionary

  • Middle French tare, from Italian tara, from Arabic طرحة (á¹­arḥa, “that which is thrown away"), a derivative of طرح (ṭáraḥa, “to throw (away)").

    From Wiktionary