Syllable meaning

sĭl'ə-bəl
The definition of a syllable is a part of a word that is pronounced with one uninterrupted sound.

An example of syllable is "kit" in the word kitchen.

noun
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To pronounce in syllables.
verb
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Any of the parts into which a written word is often divided, as at the end of a line, in approximate conformity to the spoken syllables.
noun
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To pronounce in or as in syllables.
verb
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(poetic) To utter in syllables.

Aery tongues that syllable men's names "” Milton.

verb
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The least bit of expression; slightest detail, as of something said.
noun
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(linguistics) A unit of human speech that is interpreted by the listener as a single sound, although syllables usually consist of one or more vowel sounds, either alone or combined with the sound of one or more consonants; a word consists of one or more syllables.
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The written representation of a given pronounced syllable.
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A small part of a sentence or discourse; anything concise or short; a particle.
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A word or part of a word pronounced with a single, uninterrupted sounding of the voice; unit of pronunciation, consisting of a single sound of great sonority (usually a vowel) and generally one or more sounds of lesser sonority (usually consonants)
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The slightest bit of spoken or written expression.

Do not alter a syllable of this message.

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Origin of syllable

  • Middle English sillable from Anglo-Norman alteration of Old French sillabe from Latin syllaba from Greek sullabē from sullabein second aorist of sullambanein to combine in pronunciation sun- syn- lambanein to take
    From American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition
  • Middle English and Middle French sillabe, from Latin syllaba, from Ancient Greek συλλαβή (sullabÄ“), from συλλαμβάνω (sullambanō, “I gather together"), from συν- (sun-, “together") + λαμβάνω (lambanō, “I take").
    From Wiktionary