Sweer meaning

(UK dialectal) Heavy.
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(UK dialectal) Dull; indolent; lazy.
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(UK dialectal) Reluctant; unwilling; disinclined.
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Origin of sweer

  • From Middle English swer, sware, from Old English swǣr, swār (“heavy, of great weight, oppressive, grievous, painful, unpleasant, great, sad, feeling or expressing grief, grave, slow, dull, sluggish, slothful, indolent, inactive from weakness, enfeebled, weak”), from Proto-Germanic *swēraz, *swērijaz (“heavy”), from Proto-Indo-European *swēr- (“heavy”). Cognate with West Frisian swier (“heavy, burdensome, onerous, pregnant”), Dutch zwaar (“heavy, hard, difficult”), German schwer (“difficult, hard, heavy”), Swedish svår (“hard, severe, difficult, heavy”), Latin sērius (“earnest, serious”), Lithuanian swarus (“heavy”), Albanian var (“to hang, burden, annoy”), Ancient Greek ἕρμα (herma, “prop, foundation, reef, hill”).
    From Wiktionary